Tech boom presents new wrinkles for Wrigley Field

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In this April 10, 2014 photo, Rick Fuhs operates a panel full of buttons in the press box behind home plate that sends an electrical charge into a panel of half ball-shaped “targets,” causing specific ones to flip so that they add up to form the number of the batter, and the number of balls, strikes and outs on Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard during a baseball game between Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs, in Chicago. This switch box and the only electronically operated part of the display on Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard were built in 1937 and still being used at the ballpark. With Boston’s Fenway Park and Wrigley the only two stadiums in the majors with primary manual scoreboards, it has been a job largely shrouded in mystery until the Cubs allowed The Associated Press climb the steel ladder through the steel floor of the scoreboard for a rare visit to mark Wrigley’s 100-year anniversary. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)